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Indian History Carnival – 16

The Indian History Carnival, published on the 15th of every month, is a collection of posts related to Indian history and archaeology.

  1. Recently about 70 Harappan graves were discovered in Farmana, Haryana. From this is it possible to find out if Harappan were an indigenous population or migrants? Suvrat Kher says, “My money is that they were like the rest of us living Indians, mostly native but with little pieces from outside as well.”
  2. “There are also no historical records of slave trades, prices, quantities, ownership anywhere in India. In fact, Sanskritic Indian languages have no word for slaves,” writes Anuraag in a post about Demons, Satan and Ogres and Monsters.
  3. While we know details of Chandragupta Maurya’s death, less is know about the last days of Chanakya. At varnam, there is one story of Chanakya’s death.
  4. “We do think now, that Akbar had not only finally managed to come out of the prison of Islam, and returned to his own roots, but that he was also determined to stamp out Islam from India, forcefully if needed, just before his life came to a premature end when he died of poisoning
    (killed?).” Sarvesh K Tiwari explains this in a multi part post, A Ghazi turned Kafir: the Case of Akbar’s U-Turn (Part 1, 2, 3)
  5. A Mughal painting from 1625 shows Holi being celebrated including a “drunk Jahangir being carried to to bed.”
  6. According to Thomas Hervey Baber (1777 to 1843), the man who tracked Pazhassi Raja, “the natives of the Malabar Coast were more strict observers of truth than the other inhabitants of Hindostan”
  7. “The irony can’t be harsher: While the Muslim League demanded — and got — separateness, the Hindu Mahasabha was reprimanded for fighting against this very demand for separatism.” Sandeep explains the importance of the Lucknow Pact of 1916 and Pirpur Report of 1938.
  8. In a post about Nagas in World War II Feanor says, “It is a sad fact that Indian history (at least as taught when I went to school there) has nothing at all to say about the Northeast.
  9. As India goes to the polls, Hari, based on excerpts from Ramachandra Guha’s India After Gandhi looks at the first election of 1951.
  10. Is there any difference between Manmohan Singh and Flavius Belisarius? Arby finds out
  11. Combining mythology and history, Kamini Dandapani has a travelogue about Kanya Kumari.

f you find any posts related to Indian history published in the past one month, please send it to jk AT varnam DOT org or use this form. Please send me links which are similar to the ones posted, in terms of content.The next carnival will be up on May 15th.

See Also: Previous Carnivals

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Indian History Carnival – 15

The Indian History Carnival, published on the 15th of every month, is a collection of posts related to Indian history and archaeology.

  1. On February 21 and 22, a conference on the Sindhu-Saraswati civilization was held at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles. K B Nair has a report.
  2. Prof. Arvind Sharma explains why “Western assumptions of time and space can be potentially distorting when applied uncritically in an Indian context.”
  3. Anuraag Sanghi has a long post on three battles that changed both world and Indian history
  4. Three silk fragments dating to the Mature Harappan Period (2600-1700 BCE) has been found in Harappa and Chanhu-daro which shows that Indus people knew about wild silk around the same time as the Chinese.
  5. The Thalassery Protestant Church was built sometime after 1840 and was in real bad shape when local authorities decided to restore it. Nick Balmer has a post with some photographs.
  6. In his trip to Kerala, Nikhil visited many forts, temples and caves. He  too mentions the Thalassery church.
  7. Sir Richard F. Burton,  known for his translation of Arabian Nights and Kamasutra visited Malabar in 1846. He met the Zamorin as well as a crowd of dames in the palace: “The translator of Kamasutra turns poetic while describing the ‘sight of Nair female beauty’ : ‘The ladies were very young and pretty-their long jetty tresses, small soft features, clear dark olive-coloured skins, and delicate limbs, reminded us exactly of the old prints and descriptions of the South Sea Islanders”, writes Calicut Heritage.
  8. Chandrahas in his post on the Surya Mandir at Modhera in Gujarat writes, “The idol of Surya inside the garbhagriha, or sanctum sanctorum, of the Modhera temple is long gone, plundered by Mahmud of Ghazni on one of his many raids on northern and western India in the eleventh century CE.”
  9. Now that the general elections are upon us, Arby_K looks at the elections from 1952 to 1999 and reads between the numbers.

If you find any posts related to Indian history published in the past one month, please send it to jk AT varnam DOT org or use this form. Please send me links which are similar to the ones posted, in terms of content.The next carnival will be up on March 15th.

See Also: Previous Carnivals

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Indian History Carnival – 14

The Indian History Carnival, published on the 15th of every month, is a collection of posts related to Indian history and archaeology.

  1. After reading Nicolas Ostler’s Empires of the Word: A Language History of the World, Hari writes about Sanskrit.
  2. Venetia Ansell has an interview with Prof. Lakshmi Thathachar who was a Professor of Sanskrit at Bangalore University on why the modern world needs Sanskrit.
  3. The Michael Wood documentary, The Story of India, which was telecast in six parts on PBS mentioned the connection between bird songs and mantras. varnam asks how old are our mantras?
  4. The previous post was based on a paper written by Frits Staal of UC Berkeley. Sandeep analyzes the paper to say, “We clearly see that the “pre-language era” is a shrewd excuse to push Staal’s ill-understood concoction about Mantras.”
  5. R S Krishna explains Harappan town planning and techniques on teaching this to children.
  6. Chandragupta Maurya’s son Bimbisara once requested Antiochus of Syria to send him figs, Greek wine and a Greek teacher. He got the first two, but a note came back saying that Greek law does not permit the sale of professors. But when Alexander came to Punjab, he took a Jain guru named Calanus back with him. Maddy has that story.
  7. How did ancient India deal with crime? Feanor surveys literature to find the answers.
  8. In an article about Somnath,Manish Khamesra writes about Mahmud of Ghazni’s attacks on the temple and Sardar Patel.
  9. In 1857, the British offended Hindu and Muslim sentiments and paid a price. A similar incident happened on July 10, 1806 and the Indian garrison at Vellore broke in revolt. Even before these two incidents, on April 14, 1721, more than 150 Englishmen were massacred in Kerala by a combined force of Nairs and Muslims. “After all, history teaches us that it teaches us nothing !”, writes Calicut Heritage.
  10. Sir Mirza Mohammed Ismail served as the Diwan of Mysore since 1926, of Jaipur since 1941 and of Hyderabad during independence. Murali Ramavarma has his biography. Murali writes, “Sir Mirza was a Shia Muslim by birth but he encouraged Sanskrit learning, and helped the Hindu and Christian institutions too and attended to the needs of the society with an impartial outlook holding the interest of the state above that of the individual.”
  11. Maiji who first visited Madras in 1945 writes about the differences she sees now.

If you find any posts related to Indian history published in the past one month, please send it to jk AT varnam DOT org or use this form. Please send me links which are similar to the ones posted, in terms of content.The next carnival will be up on March 15th.

See Also: Previous Carnivals

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Indian History Carnival – 12

The Indian History Carnival, published on the 15th of every month, is a collection of posts related to Indian history and archaeology.

  1. A while back, at varnam, we looked at the myth of Cheraman Perumal’s conversion to Islam. Now Maddy at Historical Alleys investigates the story of the Perumal and the pickle and writes that, “While the persons and the dates are shrouded in a veil of confusion, the one less disputed fact that remains was that a person of high standing reached Makkah after conversion and shared a jar of ginger pickle with some dignitaries.”
  2. Continuing on the same topic, Calicut Heritage wonders if this conversion was part of embracing the religion of trade like the conversion of Parameswara, a Hindu from the Srivijaya dynasty, to Islam in 1400.
  3. Bharatpur was in the news due to various political chess games being played there. Murali has a brief history of the place the British called Bhurtpore.
  4. In 1780s, William Hodges, a member of James Cook’s expeditions traveled across India. He witnessed sati in Benares and wrote about it. Feanor has an excerpt.
  5. Do you want to know how Bangalore was in the 1950s and ’60s? E. R. Ramachandran’s post is great for reading while sitting in the current Bangalore traffic.

If you find any posts related to Indian history published in the past one month, please send it to jk AT varnam DOT org or use this form. Please send me links which are similar to the ones posted, in terms of content.The next carnival will be up on Jan 15th.

See Also: Previous Carnivals

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Indian History Carnival – 11

The Indian History Carnival, published on the 15th of every month, is a collection of posts related to Indian history and archaeology.

  1. As Tamil Nadu politicians and film stars are protesting against the killing of innocent Tamils without uttering a word against the LTTE terror, Priya Raju explains the relationship between the Sri Lankan Tamils and the Indian Tamils.
  2. A two hour climb on a hill in Nijagal near Bangalore takes you to a once-impregnable fort which has a story to tell. Sandeep has a gripping account of how Madakari Nayaka of Chitradurga captured Hyder Ali’s fort with the help of among other things, Giant Monitor Lizards.
  3. Did the Portuguese have a part in “cementing the dowry system and color consciousness into the Malabari cultural fabric?” Maddy writes about various Portuguese customs in Malabar.
  4. Calicut Heritage has a story about the Kerala Soap Institute, “which used to supply soaps to the Viceroy, among other dignitaries.”
  5. The Muslim community in Malabar had a monopoly in trade as “exporters of pepper and ginger, importers of horses and necessary produce for the great Vijayanagar empire that controlled almost all of the Deccan.” Soon they faced competition with the arrival of the Portuguese and the conflict between the Portuguese and Moplahs is the topic of Mamale of Cannanore: An Adversary of Portuguese India by the French Indologist Geneviève Bouchon. tangentialia has a translation.
  6. Search Kashmir has a detailed account of the nautch girls based on the accounts of various western travelers.
  7. Writing about the Divide and Rule policy of the British, Disjointed Laptop says, “If somebody asks me, about the British Divide and Rule policy, I would say it was purely Made in India.”

If you find any posts related to Indian history published in the past one month, please send it to jk AT varnam DOT org or use this form. Please send me links which are similar to the ones posted, in terms of content.The next carnival will be up on Dec 15th.

See Also: Previous Carnivals

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