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Subhash Bose: The investigations

The Central Govt extended the term of the Liberman Commission inquiring into the demolition of disputed structure at Ayodhya, but at the same time it has denied extension to the Justice MK Mukherjee Commission investigating the disappearance of Subhash Chandra Bose. Subhash Bose, was believed to have died in a plane crash in Taipei, but recently it was discovered that there was no plane crash at that time. There are theories that he was in Soviet Union at that time and the Commision is not visiting Russia to examine the documents due to lack of time. Why is the Congress Govt. not interested in finding the truth ?

So we come to our favourite whipping boy, Jawaharlal Nehru, who had infact setup a commision to investigate Bose’s disappearance.

Intriguingly enough (a fact glossed over nowadays), Nehru declared that the death of Netaji in Taihoku aircrash was a settled fact even before the committee could furnish its report. Its tenure was a mere four months and it dared not upset Nehru’s “settled fact”. So it recommended repatriating the ashes preserved in Japan’s Renkoji temple, fabled to be of Netaji’s, but is doubtful whether it is of any human being at all. The only accompanying “proof” was a death certificate in Japanese, which, when translated into English, turned out to be a Japanese soldier who had died of heart failure from exhaustion during World War II.

The opinion of other two members of the committee was at variance with that of Shah Nawaz but his (actually Nehru’s version) prevailed. After all, this ex-INA Major General was deeply indebted to Nehru personally. In Independent India, former INA members were debarred from entering the Indian Armed forces or try their luck in politics. Nehru found INA-people “disloyal, uncouth, and unpatriotic” and it was not until Indira Gandhi’s regime that they allowed pension. On the contrary, there was no such restriction in Pakistan as Taya Jenkin informs in her book, Reporting India.

Nehru was exceptional in patronising one ex-INA brass, Shah Nawaz Khan, who was recalled (virtually highjacked) from Pakistan where he had migrated after Partition, and was made a minister of state in Nehru’s Ministry. Such was the private reason for Shah Nawaz’s public statement endorsing Nehru’s views on Netaji’s “death”. However, Nehru himself was not convinced of Netaji’s death. Indians were given to believe as gospel what people like Shah Nawaz and Habibur Rehman, who had crossed over to Pakistan, said about Netaji’s fate. A battered Nehru, sometime before his death in 1964, had engaged in correspondence with Netaji’s elder brother Ashok Bose. Nehru therein had agreed that the truth behind Netaji’s disappearance should be brought out. Nothing unsettled Nehru’s “settled fact” like his own admission. [Netaji beyond Taihoku aircrash]

There are stories that Subhash Bose came later to India and lived as a monk in Uttar Pradesh. The present commision has investigated this monk and visited the places where he stayed and examined his belongings.

We may not know the whole truth, but some information will be available when the MK Mukherjee Commision submits its report soon.

There is also a new movie by Shyam Benegal titled Bose: The Forgotten Hero based on the last five years of Subhash Bose’s life.

7 Responses to Subhash Bose: The investigations

  1. Das March 25, 2005 at 11:15 pm #

    It is quite an interesting mystery – I recall Hindustan Times having several investigative articles on Gumnami Baba including a photograph which looked surprisingly similar to Netaji (except that the baba had a graying beard.)

    I hope this commission is allowed to follow through and finally reveal the mystery behind Netaji’s disappearance …

    Thanks for the links.
    –Das

  2. Sandeep March 30, 2005 at 5:56 am #

    Excellent! BTW, I’m also following up on this. See my blog entry today (More on Netaji…). Also, I’ve moved to http://www.sandeepweb.com.

  3. Anuj Dhar May 30, 2005 at 10:37 am #

    Hi

    My name is Anuj Dhar and I have been investigating the Subhas Bose Mystery. Anyone having interest, please visit my beta site:

    http://www.geocities.com/netajimystery/home

    Regards

  4. Bratati Maitra June 28, 2005 at 12:15 pm #

    hi everyone,
    Agewise I am very young,25years,but due to many personal incidents and tragedies my maturity level has increased a lot.During my period of utter despair,It was only the ideal of NETAJI and only NETAJI,which makes me fight.I am his ardent follower,I have read his speeches, research works on his disappearances like” back from the dead again”by ANUJ DHAR and what not,but I am still to find “santh Samarth” By dr.alokesh bagchi,plsss if someone can help me,if people like dr.bagchi or mr. anuj dhar contacts me by my email,it would be really great for me.By the way i am a computer engineer(B.Tech.) working in networking line.
    Bratati Maitra.

  5. Subham July 13, 2006 at 1:34 pm #

    Hey, plz read this article

  6. sharan September 24, 2006 at 10:00 am #

    Dear Friends,

    I still feel great the moment I think about this great leader “Netaji”.

    My late father says his grand father was the chief treasure for INA in Rongoon.

    God BLess Netaji where ever he is….

    Sharan

  7. Sharan September 24, 2006 at 10:10 am #

    Dear Sir,
    The last flight that Netaji boarded was and the details of the flight as follows:

    Type: 97-2-Sally
    Function: Bomber,
    Year of Make: 1941
    Crew Capacity: 5-7,*** to be noted
    Engines: 2 ,
    Power: 1500hp,
    Make: Mitsubishi Ha-101,
    Wing Span: 22.50m,
    Length: 16.00m,
    Height: 4.85m,
    Wing Area: 69.60m2,
    Empty Weight: 6070kg,
    Max.Weight: 10610kg, Speed: 486km/h,
    Ceiling: 10000m, Range: 2700km,
    Armament: 6*mg7.7mm 1000kg

    Description
    Already obsolete at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack, the Ki-21 Type 97 heavy bomber (Allied code name ‘Sally’) remained the backbone of the Japanese Army Air Force’s bomber squadrons throughout

    —————————————

    NOw if you see the total capacity of the Aircraft is 5-7 people, how can 12 people travel in this plane.

    Thanks & Best Regards
    Sharan

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